Indirect Coombs Test

Indirect Coombs Test detects circulating antibodies against Red Blood Cells. The major purpose of the Indirect Coombs Test is to determine if the patient has minor serum antibodies (other than the major ABO/Rh system) to RBCs before receiving a blood transfusion. Therefore the Indirect Coombs Test is the “screening” portion of the “type and screen” […]
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Direct Coombs Test

Most of the antibodies to Red Blood Cells are directed against the ABO/Rh blood grouping antigens, such as those that occur in hemolytic anemia of the newborn or blood transfusion of incompatible blood. When a transfusion reaction occurs, the Coombs test can detect the patient’s antibodies coating the transfused RBCs. The Coombs test is therefore […]
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RDW Blood Test

Red Blood Cell Distribution Width (RDW) Blood Test gives an indication of the variation in Red Blood Cell size. Red Blood Cell Distribution Width is calculated by a machine using the Mean Corpuscular Volume (MCV) and RBC Count. Normally, all the RBCs are about the same size with very little variation. Variations in the width […]
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Mean Corpuscular Hemoglobin Concentration

Mean Corpuscular Hemoglobin Concentration (MCHC) is a measure of the average average concentration or percentage of hemoglobin within a single RBC. Mean Corpuscular Hemoglobin Concentration is calculated from the results of both Hemoglobin test and Hematocrit test. MCHC calculation provide more helpful information about hemoglobin production than what Mean Corpuscular Hemoglobin (MCH) can provide. By […]
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Reticulocyte Count

The reticulocyte count is a test for determining bone marrow function and evaluating erythropoietic activity. This test is also useful in classifying anemias. A reticulocyte is an immature red blood cell (RBC) that can be readily identified under a microscope by staining the peripheral blood smear with Wright or Giemsa stain. It is an RBC […]
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Red Blood Cell Smear (Morphology)

When adequately prepared and examined microscopically by an experienced technologist and pathologist, a Smear of Peripheral Blood is the most informative of all hematologic tests. All three hematologic cell lines—erythrocytes (Red Blood Cells), platelets, and leukocytes (White Blood Cells)—can be examined. In the peripheral blood, five different types of leukocytes can routinely be identified—neutrophils, eosinophils, […]
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